Carradice Cycling Artwork

Mark Jones recently sent us copies of these marvellous images that he has just finished creating. Mark is a Carradice saddlebag fan and also lived in Lancashire during the 90’s so he knows our landscape well. Mark’s inspiration is semi-autobiographical and his style in these three pictures is inspired by the late great Frank Patterson, the father of mid-century cycling line drawings.
Mark has used his own bikes (a Mercian or Gunnar) in the pictures along with a Harris Tweed Barley Carradice saddlebag.

Lancashire Lanes II sm

Lancashire Lanes I sm

Lancashire Lanes III sm
You can view more of Marks work by clicking here.

Or here. You can also purchase the prints on a variety of mediums at very reasonable prices.

Frank Patterson (born 12 October 1871 – died 17 July 1952) was an English illustrator best remembered for his pen and ink drawings of cycling in the first half of the 20th century. He was born in Portsmouth before moving to London and later to Billingshurst, West Sussex with his wife Emily.

He began drawing for Cycling Weekly in 1893 right up until his death. He also drew for the Cyclist Touring Club’s magazine, “The Gazette” from 1925. He produced over 26,000 line drawings and boasted that he never missed a deadline.

Here are three examples of his drawings depicting cycle touring. We can’t say for definite that the bags are all Carradice saddlebags but there would have been plenty in use around this era.

frank patterson 201

Frank Patterson02

Frank patterson03

The next few images have been sent in by Nigel Moody who is an artist and Carradice user from Norfolk who is in the image below. 

image3 1

image1 1

Below is an old Carradcie saddlebag which is similar to one you may have seen in the brocures from our previous blog.

image2 1

image2

The image above is an old Carradice 'longflap' which is on a Holdworth Typhoon bicycle. It even has a 1980's Brooks 'select'.

image3

The bike in the image above is a bike which was make by a man who used to make 'paris' frames for himself but is a conventional diamond frame.

image1
The last image shows Nigel's Woodrup bike and SQR Tour bag propped against his work bench. The attention to detail is fascinating, right down to the Reynolds frame badges, Castrol oil can and Campagnolo gears.
You can see more of Nigel’s work by clicking here.